Parental Guidance

As the Founder of 10/31 Consortium, I would like to thank you all for your interest in our organization. As the mother of those 2 adorable monsters to the left, however,  I would like to offer the following as guidance for parents considering bringing their children to the Halloween Parade:

 

 

 

Halloween is a time of so many beautiful things –  artistry, creativity, self expression, imagination, community, etc.  All of these things can be demonstrated in several ways. These include with horror or non-horror related costumes, as platforms for free speech on just about any topic and/or they can cater directly to the innocence of childhood.

 

10/31 Consortium and the Baton Rouge Halloween Parade strive to be a celebration of all of these things.

 

This parade is for our entire community. All are invited and the parade is intended to be family friendly. It is written in our Rules and Regulations that vulgarity and profanity are not allowed. However, it is important for spectators to understand that there is no review process to weed out potentially offensive costumes, decorations or music. It is the nature of Halloween (and life in general) that what one finds offensive, another finds entertaining. Therefore, such a process would be futile.

 

As with all forms of entertainment, it is the parents’ responsibility to determine if this is appropriate for their children. You know your children and their comfort level. You know what delights and frightens them. As is common knowledge in South Louisiana, not all parades are suitable for all children. You should decide if this parade is appropriate for your children, not the parade planners.

 

We do, however, hope parents will prepare their children, and, if needed help them with perspective – teach them to see the wonder, instead of the terror, in a cardboard box transformed into a Tyrannosaurus Rex. Or to appreciate the simple wisp of imagination it takes to turn a sheet into a ghost. Let children know it’s OK to be bothered or scared by a zombie, and let them know that they are safe.

 

Additionally, there may be some short skirts or low-cut tops or “sexy” costumes. However, living in the South, we often see more skin on a hot July afternoon. Again, perspective makes all the difference.

 

We suggest you reinforce that the parade is a chain dance of costumes, make-believe and people who are not all alike. A child with a highly developed sense of fantasy will not have difficulty relating to that scene. If your kids are sensitive or easily scared, we suggest bringing them when they are older.

 

If you take a young child to the parade, it can be a risk. However, it can also be a growing opportunity filled with creativity and imagination. The outcome does not depend on all parade participants dressing with children in mind, it depends on you.

 

Again, thank you for your interest in 10/31 Consortium and the Baton Rouge Halloween Parade. Please feel free to contact me personally if you would like to discuss this further.

 

Scare ya later,

Kelley Criscoe Stein

Founder of 10/31 Consortium

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad